Top GLBT reads

Top GLBT Reads from 2016 Pic 01 by Casey Carlisle

GLBTQIA+ is such a wide banner, and I get great enjoyment from reading diversity in this genre – but here’s the top five titles I read in 2016…

Tales From Foster High Book 1 Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleThis edition is a bind-up of the first three novellas, and while in appearance, it starts of stereotypical, it quickly deconstructs these tropes with the main characters. Our protagonist, Kyle, starts of as the invisible kid, the nerd that everyone overlooks, and his journey into the man he wants to be. This is a romance with some important issues that gay youth (and society) face. A little unrealistic at times, but adorable characters with an important message. I’m interested in exploring the rest of the series, but am having difficulty with availability, different versions of editions and bind-ups, and many only available in ebook.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 4 stars by Casey Carlisle

 

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

you-know-me-well-book-review-pic-01-by-casey-carlisle This is by far my favourite book penned by David Levithan to date. I like his novels, they have interesting characters, a gay narrative, build great relationships and end in some poignant positive note. ‘You Know Me Well’ was all that and more.

We get a young teen coming of age, laced with edgy sarcastic humour. But this time the portrayal felt more realistic to me than in many of Levithan’s other titles. And just when I was sure the direction the book would take – it shot off on a tangent. I wasn’t expecting the big Pride fest either. A little cheesy, a little overdone gayness, but had an easy flow and captured my interest from the get go – I could barely put it down. Not that its compelling, rather more engaging and heart-warming. I connected with the protagonists, Mark and Kate more than I have with any of the cast in Levithan’s previous novels. And it was great to have a lesbian perspective. Most of his books have been dominated with a gay male perspective – it was great to see more than one gender represented.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 4 stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

If I Was Your Girl Book Review Pic 01 by Casey Carlisle The first thing that drew me to ‘If I Was Your Girl’ was the amazing cover art; and the second was when I found out it was a contemporary with a transgender protagonist. I’ve read a few other titles similar and enjoyed the concepts of identity and social anxiety – they make compelling stories.

I found Amanda, our protagonist, to be strong but a little naive and a somewhat whiny – but it worked for her age and to set up her hearts desires. It was easy to relate to the fear and anxiety Amanda goes through and how it is always there, as it would be with anyone hiding a big secret. The treatment of questions about her old name, body parts and surgeries, and how they should never be asked just made sense. It’s intimate and personal and is passive-aggressive, if not a form of bullying to ask if you do not have a close relationship. But it is always one of the first questions out of people’s mouths when they discover someone is transgender. It actually taught me some deportment in handling this issue, and for that I am thankful. The last thing I want to do is come across as rude and mean in the face of someone who is going through a difficult journey.

The violence described in this book that Amanda lived through felt a bit much. I understand it is a real issue for transgender teens, but for me personally, was confronting and didn’t add much to the story. Although, its educating readers to real world fears people like Amanda face – it makes a blunt, horrific point which I find disgusting and devastating.

A great book about a girl’s emotional journey into adulthood.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 4 stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

The Art of Being Normal Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleWhat ‘The Art of Being Normal’ brought to the table was a level of realism that transgendered youth face depicted really well. Identity and coming out, along with a plethora of other aspects were handled gracefully within the narrative. It was such an enjoyable read for me.

Told with alternating P.O.V’s, it begins with David, the bullied outsider. I like how this character dealt with gender identity intelligently. Research. Though this is only the beginning of David’s journey. It should have been noted somewhere that not all trans know they were born in the wrong body at an early age – sometimes it’s an evolution from something not feeling quite right before arriving at the at conclusion of being transgendered (and involved diagnosis from a professional). I felt like it glazed over some important mechanics in the transgendered experience for the sake of story. Though David was a little frustrating for me at times, I was able to relate and enjoyed a different view of the world at large.

Our second narrator, Leo is an all-around good guy. I enjoyed his strength and found his stand-offishness true to character. However, I guessed the plot twist involving his story from the beginning. Kind of deflated my enjoyment a little. Loved Leo. His story, his mannerisms. And it was great to see a separation in narrative styles with the switching POV’s – Lisa Williamson did a fantastic job with each of their voices.

Begrudgingly I admit it lacked a personal engagement from me, something intangible about the characters of David and Leo held me back from truly believing in them. I also had an issue with how they were obliged to get along – it felt forced and artificial.

It’s all a very “nice’ depiction of a transgendered experience – and I use that term hesitantly – because some youth experience so much more darkness and hardship. But that is too serious for what is meant to be a supportive, uplifting, and positive story about trying to live your truth.

Proud to have ‘The Art of Being Normal’ in my library, it has been the most grounded story that has dealt with sexual identity in such a point-blank style to date. Refreshing.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 4 stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

wilful-machines-book-review-pic-01-by-casey-carlisle In a sci-fi future at a boarding school (reminding me a little of Harry Potter) with robots and conspiracies – totally had me engrossed.

Lee, our “Walk-In” protagonist (well closeted gay teen,) coming to terms with living up to his family’s expectations, watched everywhere he goes by cameras or security, it’s no wonder he’s attempted suicide… but that’s all in the past. He’s just trying to get by. I was interested from the first page and read this book in one sitting. We see Lee’s character develop slowly throughout the storyline and I identified with his insecurities, having to live up to an image and the pressures of responsibility.

When a new student starts at Inverness Prep, Nico, the dreamboat all the girls swoon over – so does Lee. And luck would have it, Nico seems interested in Lee too. If only Lee weren’t a “Walk-in.” Nico is a little wacky, messy, and loves to sprout lines from Shakespeare, so it’s not like he fits into any model jock trope. I liked how their friendship develops and how each of their trust is tested in the story.

There is a fair amount of predictability for the novel, but I think it’s on purpose, because the main point of the novel isn’t what happens, but the questions it raises. I’d guessed the major plot points early on, but still got a lot of surprises along the way.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 4 and a half stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads from 2016 Pic 02 by Casey Carlisle

not-your-sidekick-book-review-pic-01-by-casey-carlisle There is a lot of fun to be had reading this book. ‘Not Your Sidekick’ is choc-full of superheroes, has a diverse cast, and some plot twists that come out of nowhere. Learning about a dystopian earth in the future suffering affects from a solar flare, and humans presenting powers (called meta-humans) run by the government as superheroes. That’s a pretty cool premise.

The first half of the book is a little slow, but still compelling. Mixed with a lot of humour and comic book styled tales, it didn’t bore me at any point. Lee’s writing style is witty and fresh, tapping into the psyche of a sullen confused teen expertly.

If the mention of super heroes hasn’t tipped you off – I’ll tell it to you straight. Expect campy goodness. Cheese and moments that are way over the top. It comes part and parcel with this genre.

Our protagonist, Jessica Tran, an Asian bisexual high school student, with just the right mix of confusion, vulnerability and sarcasm to keep me glued to the page. I did find however, due to a few things in the storyline, she can come across as a little dumb at moments – which doesn’t work well with the fact she performs well at school and her new job. I think the author needs to revise that plot point so Jessica doesn’t appear so stupid. Her anxiety over approaching her crush was spot on – I felt all the angst right along there with her. The addition to a great relationship with her parents (also meta-humans) and two best friends, was refreshing. There was no “poor me I’ve suffered so much“ going on with Jessica. She was just a regular insecure teen trying to find her place in the world.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 3 and a half stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA James Crawford has been fearless when writing this trilogy, not fading away from carnage and devastation, and his writing has gotten better with each installment. With the final book prolific in the grandiose battle and wrapped up the trilogy expertly. This guy really knows how to write a climactic ending.

I did get a little disappointed with having precedence set up with ‘Caleo’ and ‘Jack’ being each from their perspectives respectively, to ‘Nolan’ told in multiple perspective. And I didn’t get to live inside Nolan’s head for as long as I wanted to. We got snippets of his backstory, but did not get to dwell in the present, fathom out motivations and feelings with him as we did the other main characters in the preludes. So I felt a little cheated.

I admit having some issues with the writing style and plot in each of the books, but is marathoned you’ll get a much better experience. A fun addition to my library.

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 3 and a half stars by Casey Carlisle

Top GLBT Reads for 2016 Rainbow Banner by Casey Carlisle

I’m finding a lot to relate to in this genre. The diversity is growing in terms of sexuality and gender identity in new releases starting to add new narratives in the market. It taps into that outsider and minority feeling we all get at some point in our lives – which is why these titles, and movie like the X-Men franchise are so popular. I look forward to discovering some more great GLBTQIA+ titles this year.

Happy reading!

uppercase-lowercase-banner-by-casey-carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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4 thoughts on “Top GLBT reads

  1. Eternal Gypsy says:

    Thanks for the post! ‘You Know Me Well’ and ‘Willful Machines’ were already in my TBR pile but ‘If I Was Girl’ had me on the fence. I think your post convinced me to check it out. I want to look into ‘The Art of Being Normal’ too.

    For me, who you are and who you love isn’t nearly as important as THAT you love. Books like these, it’s the emotional journey the characters take that makes me want to stay plugged in. I’m always fascinated by the dynamics of situations and personalities. Cause and effect. The eye opening experience and empathy broadening is just a bonus.

    • femaleinferno says:

      Totally agree, and while these books aren’t my all time favorite, and just those of last year, they still offer up a great deal. I can’t resist a good book holiday 🙂

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