Ghostwriting and earning money from writing under a pseudonym

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I aspire to write novels under my own name… but at the moment, the majority of my income comes from writing for other people.

Ghostwriting, or writing for other people so they can attach their name to your work as the author is more prevalent than you might think. More so in Non-Fiction genres, but it’s pretty much everywhere.

When you take a step back and view writing as a whole – and not just novel writing – there are plenty of opportunities to earn a living. For me, I’ve diversified. I get a little bit here, a little bit there, and it all adds up enough to support myself as I chase my dream. That suits me. If I focused on a certain specialization, I find I get stagnant with creative flow, as well as being pigeon-holed as only being able to produce that kind of material. I like to mix it up and keep things fresh.

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The majority of my income is derived from Manuals, Text books, Academic Support Material, and Speech Writing. It’s also easier to do because it’s more about conveying facts than embellishment and world building. Plus I love research, so I find it fun. It’s the type of work where there is a team involved – you work to a spec, fact check, submit for feedback and re-write. You get a stamp of approval and it’s off to someone else to worry about the editing, formatting, publishing, and marketing.

It’s much the same as Article Writing for media, except in media you need to include marketing terms and hot topic phrases (*cough* click bait *cough*) which is usually for an established columnist who is on a break or overworked. You will get a sample of their writing style to match before submitting. If you do a good enough job it can mean a fairly regular source of work.

I used to do a lot of Copywriting, but am scaling back on that, as the Marketing environment has grown exponentially in the last five years, and with so much new talent and a technology/social media focus, I’m not wanting to take a year or so off to update my skills in order to compete. It’s time I’d much rather spend writing my own content.

Screenwriting is something I fell into, and I’m finding the more work I do, the more offers I get. It was a case of who you know to get this score. Always a part of a writing team, deadlines that must be met no matter what, and I’ve gotten to work for some big movie productions down to a scripted YouTube piece.

71a83a70-33b2-4e9c-89be-b9a98cf8220eAll of that is fun and full of variety, but I’m also branching out into releasing work under a pseudonym. Only because in the world of publishing and marketing, everything is genre based. You can’t become established as a Mystery writer and then drop a cookbook on your dedicated fan base. So it’s recommended by your publishing team to ‘brand’ yourself. And thus alter ego’s are born. Plus the different genres/forms of publishing differ greatly for each pseudonym. They have their own marketing plans and budgets, different demographics and markets. Although I’m only small fry, it makes me feel like some big corporation at times with all this diversification with my writing.

All that I’ve mentioned is well and good for an established writer. I’ve got degrees, industry contacts, and thirty years of experience. For those of you starting out, do the research. Each of these endeavors were the result of weeks of toiling through information to form an action plan. Know your stuff. The internet has provided you with perfect tool to get the advice you need right in front of you for free. It just takes some time and perseverance to pull it all together. Plus, you need to get out there and network. Attend industry conferences in the field you are interested in writing for, publishing workshops, writers groups – the more resources you have, the better equipped you’ll be. Make sure you have samples of your writing handy at all times, whether it’s something you can email, or examples listed on a website, these will be crucial for attracting paid work. Don’t be afraid to put in a submission for work. Call places or send them an email query. It is an investment of time in trying to set up and get prepared for an income other than that from your novel… but it will mean you are a full-time writer.

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These different forms of writing income have given me freedom to follow my passion, and although I’m not getting credit for my work in the form of notoriety – because it’s being published under someone else’s name. It does provide the financial freedom I need to work from wherever I carry my laptop. Plus releasing work under a pseudonym not only gives me a chance to brand work best suited to marketing activity to reach its target demographic, but also gives you the opportunity to try out different tactics in promoting. Whether traditionally published, or self-publishing, it will always be beneficial to learn how to sell your own work.

Keep at it author friends – find a way to follow your dreams!

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© Casey Carlisle 2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How do you read so many books?

A question I get asked a lot, but in truth, I could be reading much more.

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I had a little think about the secret to roaring through that TBR pile… and here’s the answer:

How do you read so many books Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleThe simplest answer is mood reading. I only ever pick up books that I get excited about after reading the blurb, that I am keen to crack the cover and start to discover the world within. If after a short way in, my attention wains, I put it back on the shelf for another time.

How do you read so many books Pic 03 by Casey CarlisleAnother aspect is that I read about an hour every day. It’s a part of my routine. At the end of the day, curled up in bed, reading for a while helps calm my mind so I can relax into sleep. I used to suffer insomnia terribly, but reading has helped immensely. Sometimes it can work against me, especially if the novel is enthralling… but that only adds to the excitement. Like I’m being naughty staying up late to read a book. Crap – I’m such a nerd.

Long row of colorful library books isolated on white backgroundI vary the genre as well. A diet of only romance or YA will eventually lead to becoming bored. You’ve read it all before… So I mix it up as much as I can. Heck I’ve even read a textbook.

 

Reading Kindle on a trainWhen I lived in the city, I was always that girl on the train or tram with her head in a book – that’s an extra hour or more a day to indulge in my favourite past time. At the airport, at the dentist or doctors waiting room, I don’t miss an opportunity when some downtime presents itself… without being antisocial.

How do you read so many books Pic 06 by Casey CarlisleThere is always a book in my handbag. And if by some random momentary lapse I forget to slip it in as I leave the house, there are many titles to choose from on my phone e-reader.

I’m not lying about all day, every day with my nose between the pages. I have a life to live too. Whenever someone comments at the volume of novels I get through, they seriously think I’m a lady of leisure, sipping tea on the couch reading romance novels… gag me that’s infuriating. I can’t believe there is still a stigma that reading equals lazy, and no life goals. We read to learn, to escape, to be entertained.

What are your best reading habits?

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© Casey Carlisle 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Thanks Life. Thanks Writing.

city-vs-country-pic-01-by-casey-carlisleKnow thy neighbour…

I’ve mentioned many times in my posts about my move to the country to pursue writing… but today it dawned on me – literally a ray of sun broke through the dappled clouds as I sat on the balcony with dinner (and a glass of champagne) staring at the coastline, feeling relaxed… I know all of my neighbours. We talk often. I even know the staff at the local stores I shop at regularly. And I can’t say that for the city I lived in for seven years prior to moving here.

What is it about crowds that allow us to disappear?

I even have long friendly chats with our Postie – she’s a lovely woman with a daughter just about to graduate high school and we joke over all manner of life’s predicaments.

When I stare out the window I always get some small surprise. Local wildlife putting on a show. Last week it was millions of white butterflies, this week all the rose bushes are starting to blossom in hues of ivory and pink.

I’ve always said I’m a city girl at heart, and I stick by it. I miss the shopping, outings to catch up with friends, choices for dining out… and wearing nice clothes – and heels! Okay now my girlie girl is starting to show. But living in the country has afforded me to follow my writing seriously, though, it hasn’t come without some sacrifice.

Writing is such a solitary endeavour. Sometimes when I look up from the computer monitor a whole week has gone by and I haven’t stepped outside the house. When inspiration takes over and your furiously typing time has a way or sneaking by.

So, in the theme of thanksgiving – even though it’s not something we celebrate in Australia – I’m thankful for the place I live in, and where I’m at in my life right now. No complications. Free to follow the grammatical muse. I appreciate my surroundings and acknowledge the inspiration it brings. And I LOVE that I get to do something fulfilling every day. Write.

It’s by no means altruistic or world changing, but it fills me up and pays me back tenfold.

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Becoming a successful author

Today, it’s not just about writing a book, signing a publishing deal or self-publishing – you need to have a career path and a marketing plan as well.

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It’s not essential, but if you want to have longevity in the industry and earn decent financial recompense for the blood, sweat and tears you’ve invested in your novel, then pop on your thinking cap and start planning and brainstorming now.

If you approach any traditional publisher, they are going to want to know what your future plans are; and what you have already done to reach an audience for your completed manuscript. These days, traditional publishers don’t do a great deal of marketing for your novel either. Most of the time, the backing of their name on your spine opens doors to retail outlets and websites for copies of your brainchild. So yes, you get a wider reach to markets you wouldn’t otherwise get. And, let’s be real. The publisher re-coups all costs out of the proceeds of your sales over the length of your contract. On a side note, you need to be legal savvy in regards to the contract too – you could be losing out more than you think.

So while you reach a more global demographic and market, your return on investment will be much smaller. A publisher will not sign you on one book alone either. The need to see plans for future novels, or more in a series. It makes you a safer investment, a bigger cash cow. It’s more realistic to think about a 5 year, or even a 10 year plan. Know how long it takes you to knock off a book, have it edited and publish ready. Have multiple books already plotted out, and chapter samples for perusal. With such a competitive market, you need to give yourself the biggest possible chance.

All this is also true if you plan on self-publishing. If you want readers to invest in purchasing your novel, they need to know you are a writer of substance and sustainability. Tease them about the next novel coming soon. Hint that your first novel is the first in a series… You want to offer a promise to get them to return. And follow through! That’s why you have that massive plan for years into the future. Know your release dates and work to them. It adds to the buzz of your launches and sales if you can also get them excited about the next release. How many times have you finished a book and wish you could read the next in the series straight away? Cash in you your own hype.

Having this plan also lets you realistically work to deadlines and have a life outside of writing.

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Now for the marketing portion. You need to put a plan in place for how you are going to get the word out, how you are going to connect and engage with an audience. Hand in hand with this you’ll need a centralised place for people to go and find out about you (and your releases.) Be it a website, a facebook page, or another medium, make sure you have something. Update it regularly with whatever is your marketing shtick. Pictures, funny anecdotes, news on your writing progress, writing advice, video clips, top 10 lists, make it is as unique as you are. Because you are your brand.

Ensure the people who read your book also use the medium you are using. For instance, don’t use LinkedIn to promote your children’s book. A little bit of common sense and market research go a long way.

There is tons of advice on the internet on how to use social media and build your brand – it’s literally everywhere. You don’t have to do all of the different social media outlets either. Choose a few that you are comfortable with, that you can use easily, and stick to that.

Calendar out your posts, countdown to a book release, tease the story. Do it for every book you release. Engage with your audience. There is nothing more satisfying to a reader than sending an author of a novel you loved a message and getting a response.

You can also approach a marketing company for help it you aren’t that savvy. Yes it costs money, but marketing is one investment that yields returns. You spent all this time writing your book, don’t you want to give it the best possible chance of becoming a best-seller? Marketing companies can do what is called ambient PR, and they also have contacts within the media industry. That equates to stories in the paper, television appearances, invitations to exclusive events, booking signing tours. And that’s just the basic stuff – maybe you want to get creative. Promote your book by skydiving and releasing pamphlets and live stream it on YouTube… it’s only as limited as your imagination (and let’s face it, your funds.)

Creating all this hype is like putting money it the bank, it grows in interest. People talk, word gets out and you reach a wider audience. That in turn also drives revenue towards your next book release. Just don’t leave too big a gap between releases without any marketing activities. No-one likes dead air. All that hype you generated will be for naught. That’s by you need to plan it out. Lock in calendar dates and go for it.

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It would be nice to simply download a marketing plan from a website – but the reality of it is, you need to create one specific to your brand, product, and demographic. If you write YA, then you’re more likely to reach them on twitter and YouTube, at the cinemas, music festivals… Think of colour, vitality, and a great hook line; create something to grab their attention. Romance readers, probably use facebook and pinterest more, frequent coffee shops and boutique stores… I know I’m generalising, but it’s to give you an idea of where to start.

Take note of marketing campaigns that have caught your interest – can you adapt that idea for your gain?

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Creating a plan of books to be released, and a marketing plan to boot is an author’s business plan and feasibility study rolled into one. You’re taking steps to ensure your novel will sell, showing that you are a good investment, whether to readers, traditional publishers, or to yourself.

Give yourself the best possible chance for success, take some time and start plotting some ideas. Think big. You can always scale back.

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Am I good enough?

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Helping writers deal with anxiety.

Pretty much everyone in the literary world when creating a piece of work has a moment of doubt (or many). For some it can be crippling. For others, its a moment that is easy to push past and get on with the job.

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A writer friend of mine gets so worried about their work and what others might think about it, that even after coming up on ten years of writing, not a single manuscript has seen the light of day. Constantly re-writing or scrapping parts to start over. Emotions run high, depression and mood swings from moments of being sure that this is ‘the’ vocation – to calling it a hobby, and nothing about that is good or serious.

That would seriously drive me crazy!

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I’m lucky enough that I had to deal with constructive criticism early in life. I was a dancer. Ballroom and Latin. I even went on to win two Australian titles in the 90’s. With that, hours of rehearsal under the speculative gaze of my peers and adjudicators, all judging me on my appearance, movement, technique… and at first it felt personal. It’s hard not to. You are being judged on how you look, your facial expressions, body shape, how you walk, raise your arm… it’s very intimate. So you have to learn when someone says “that’s ugly” they aren’t calling you ugly: it’s the combination of all the little parts that go into your presentation that aren’t meshing well.

It took some time to grow a thick skin and learn that sort of criticism can be gold if handled well.

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Comparatively, writing rings a very similar note. It’s also intimate. We put our blood, sweat and tears into the whole thing. We live it. It is an extension of our own being. So negative comments – or fear of them – is debilitating.

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We need to get that into the frame of mind that criticism, reviews, input from others is only going to help us improve the manuscript. And also let us know what parts we were torturing ourselves over, is in fact, relevant.

Critical writing partners and beta readers have helped me wheedle out parts of a manuscript that weren’t working, elements which are derivative, and other parts that are great. It also let me know about some things I wasn’t sure of – many times my consternation was completely unwarranted.

Yes, I got that ice cold weight in the pit of my stomach when handing over pages for my colleagues to read. But once you do it a few times it becomes easier. Especially when you see how your writing evolves into a much more fantastic creature.

It’s easier to say, push through it. Everybody is different and handles criticism with varying degrees of emotional attachment. But if you can start viewing your completed manuscript as something you can improve (through market research, using critique partners and beta readers) and develop that critical eye, you are setting yourself up to stay the distance as a writer.

No one wants to be crippled by fear. You’re not writing all those pages to forever remain in a box under your bed.

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Cheap Hair Hack to add moisture and re-condition your hair.

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It’s always nice to go to a salon, have the relaxing head massage and tended to with a lovely assortment of perfumed treatments followed by a gorgeous blowout to make your hair feel like brand new. You do that hair flip as you walk down the street feeling like a million bucks… and it certainly nearly cost that much. Then you feel guilty for having spent money on something so vain and frivolous.

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Well you shouldn’t you are worth it. Spending money on yourself every once in a while is not something you should associate with guilt. At the end of the day, we have to look after ourselves.

But, if you don’t have the cash to go out splurging when you want to. A handy tip you can do at home with the products you already have can give you that same new treatment feeling to rescue your hair.

I’m a hairstylist of nearly 40 years and have used this hair hack on myself many times. Instead of an in-salon treatment, or even going out and purchasing one from the store, you can use every day conditioner. That’s right, in damp towel-dried hair, slather in a generous amount, (plait it back if you have long hair) and leave it in overnight. I suggest to put a towel over your pillow to protect it.

When you rinse it out in the morning your hair will feel just as silky smooth as if you got an expensive treatment.

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You don’t have to do it overnight, of course. But I’m lazy, and busy, so it’s the only time I can spare to pamper my locks.

If you are spending the morning doing some house cleaning, you can add the conditioner to damp hair, then wrap some plastic wrap over the top – the heat your body temperature generates while tidying the house will help the process along. Rinse, then ta-da! Alternatively, if you have a day at home when you are not going to see anyone, add your choice of conditioner, put on a plastic shower cap and rinse out at night… how you get the job done isn’t important. As long as the conditioner remains in your hair for a decent amount of time, you should get results.

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Some conditioners can weigh the hair down for those with fine hair, but it helps seal the scales of the hair down to lock in moisture and give a shiny smooth appearance. You will see varying results with different brands of conditioners too. But as you already have some in your shower caddy – it’s free! And you don’t have to make time in your schedule to visit a stylist.

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

With so many tips and tricks out there, do we really need a hairdresser?

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It’s an interesting question – especially with the advent and reach of electronic media and a rise in cost efficient D.I.Y. trends, it’s true that some people have never set foot in a salon.

So, I guess the answer is – it depends on your hair goals.  #hairgoals

For those who don’t want complicated and tailored permanent hair colouring solutions, you can do much of the colouring at home. Temporary and semi-permanent colours are very easy to D.I.Y.  And if you are diligent, the end result can be just as good that any professional stylist could acomplish.

The same goes for cuts and styling. It all comes down to how good your skill is, the products you are using, and if you are happy with the results you can produce.

Hairdressers, or Hair Stylists are trained. And they aren’t the ones attempting double-jointed elbow manoeuvres to see in a bathroom mirror – we pay them for a perfect result. So these professionals should be offering security, safety and excellent results.

That is in an ideal world.

We all hear horror stories of beauty services gone rouge. But to be honest – they all come about from either untrained stylists, lazy professionals, or cutting corners (there are certain rules of hair science that you just shouldn’t break).

So that, and affordability, are the biggest reasons many people are turning to maintaining their locks at home.

Some states here in Australia have a regulating body to try and stomp out the Sweaty-Betty stylists; and I’ve compared consumer satisfaction from those states to others that are unregulated through polls over the past 20 years, and surprise, surprise. There is no difference. The government has simply found a way to make more revenue off of a niche market in small business. Because, let’s face it, hairdressing isn’t a massive corporate industry. It’s dominated by small and sole proprietor salons. But I digress…

So why should we be stepping into a salon if it is such a big roll of the dice?

Well… sometimes we have no choice. If we want those blonde foils all over, or suffer from fine hair issues, or desire chemically straightened hair, maybe an elegant wedding up-do. We need a professional.

And so it comes back around to finding the perfect stylist for you.

How do we do that – well I’ll post some tips next week, but for now let’s stay on track about whether it’s worth it to fork over a small fortune to reach your hair goals.

Firstly, if the desired change is easy enough to achieve at home, there is no reason why you shouldn’t. But – and here’s the disclaimer – make sure you know what you are doing and know all about the products you are using. Because at the end of the day if something goes wrong, you’ll have no-one to blame but yourself.

Hair at Home Pic 03 by Casey CarlisleThe key part is skill and product. Do some dry runs on yourself first. Want to colour your hair – practice application with some conditioner. It usually takes 30-60 mins to process (depending on the product) and you don’t want to take too long getting the crème where it should be and get an uneven colour. If you’re new to the product, it pays to do a skin test to make sure you don’t have a reaction – mix a small portion and test it on the skin just behind your ear. Hairdressers should be doing this anyway if you are hypoallergenic. Do a test strand. Especially if it’s permanent hair colour. Make sure it’s going to actually work and give you what you want.

That’s the skill part roughly summarised. The other is product.

Read everything! I mean it. All the fine print, the box, info online (a lot of safety instructions are hidden in a MSDS on some website these days), ask the retailer or manufacturer for advice, watch some videos online  – every step you need to take to make sure you are fully informed.

Hair at Home Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleAnother important point that many forget it have a ‘get out’ plan. If things start going south, what are you going to do? A chemical burn, the wrong colour, crooked bangs; have some sort of contingency in mind as a just in case.

Some may view everything I’ve just pointed out as scary… and my advice to you: if anything I’ve just raised about D.I.Y. hair care gives your concern, you should be finding yourself a professional stylist. Hair does grow back if you screw things up, but who wants to go through that pain. But if you do something like a chemical burn, or a violent allergic reaction – that may be something your hair (or you) don’t recover from. Chemical hair services generally release oxygen as a part of the process, so for goodness sake, do not smoke and be sitting around candles. Why would you want to risk setting your hair on fire?

That’s a very general discussion on home hair styling coming from a professional stylist of over 25 years. For me personally, I do all of my hair colouring, styling and cutting at home. But not only do I have the dexterity and know-how, I also have a very easy to maintain style. It’s long, choppy layered and all one colour. If I had a more precise cut, short hair or multi coloured hair (like foils) I’d be visiting a salon.

Hair at Home Pic 04 by Casey CarlisleAnd hey – I still learn tips and tricks from Youtube videos and other stylists. You never stop learning. So if you want to save some dollars and have more control over your hair and choose to do it at home, it is possible as long as you are realistic about your skills and your #hairgoals.

You don’t have to be a maverick or take big risks, simply get informed and follow instructions and you’ll have salon perfect hair everyday straight from your bathroom mirror!

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I’d love to have a boyfriend… but I’m too fat right now.

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A writer can live a very sedentary life, and because of that, the weight can sneak on if you are not vigilant… a little bit here, a little bit there – no fuss. Until one day when you can no longer buckle your jeans or get your favourite dress over your thighs. That’s the point where you feel like you’ve been slapped in the face, and it makes you feel ugly.

Damn girl – why you eat so many cookies at the computer!?

Now I’m not one to weight shame anyone. I think my body is beautiful. But when nothing in your wardrobe sits right, and movement feels a little off, it’s hard to feel confident. There’s that little voice in the back of your mind telling you at you are not desirable, that people are going to look at you and quickly turn their head away in distaste.

Where the hell does that come from?

Well… me!

I'm too fat right now Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleMy clothes don’t fit – buy new clothes, shopping is always fun. Or hey, get a bit fitter… get out, walk, jump on the treadmill. Start cleaning up your diet, eat real food by eliminating processed food or anything that comes in a packet.

So that’s my new goal over the next few months – to love myself and treat my body with the respect it deserves.

This is not measured in what number is on the scales, or on my dress size. It’s measured in how I feel when I wake up, when I walk out the door. I want that “Hey there world, I’m here!” feeling back.

I’m at the age where a part of the weight gain is hormonal, so ideals of a stick thin body shape I had in my twenties is totally unrealistic. I actually like having some curves.

This stigma of weight and body shape hasn’t come from other girls, magazines and the entertainment industry. It’s come from how I feel about myself – we are all our own worst critics. So, like the writer I am, I’m changing the narrative. Instead of saying I feel fat or ugly, or nothing looks right; I’m going to re-invent myself right at that point in time to find out what would make me feel better – and do it1 Find clothes that are more flattering, add some bling, accentuate my better assets. Skip the chocolate biscuit. Spend 20 minutes walking… it’s not about making myself look pretty for someone else, it’s about being comfortable and confident about myself.

I'm too fat right now Pic 04 by Casey CarlisleBecause, in all honesty if my dream guy (or girl) came up to me and asked me out right now, I’d start a mental list of all the things that are wrong with me that I need to hide – and that is not healthy!

So I’m stopping that destructive thought pattern. I’m going to start being the person I want to be. You don’t need validation from others, or have a cutie pie on your arm to be attractive. Beauty comes from the confidence to be yourself.

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That’s how I’m going to lose weight – by shedding the negativity.

And remember the quality that most people find attractive is a smile 😀

 

 

 

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

I, Me, Mine.

What would happen if we removed self identifiers and possessive nouns from our language – would we live as more of a collective consciousness?

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Today I had a random thought about language and its power… In a world of self importance, greed, selfies and vanity, what if ‘I’ was replaced with ‘us?’ How would that change our outlook on life and the world in a larger scale?

Maybe there would be no hunger, poverty and war because one single person did not own anything – it’s all community property. It takes a bit to get your head around.

Indigenous communities illustrate a communal view better, like the aboriginals where they don’t own portions of land, but belong to it. Everything is shared and duty of care is extended to the tribe as a hole.

Think about it – you could walk over the road into your neighbours house and make yourself a cuppa and watch their tv – because there is no boundaries, no ownership. Blows your mind right. I seriously doubt it would happen with the greed and ownership indoctrinated into us from birth. So don’t go wandering into someone’s house just yet. There is a whole psyche that needs to be addressed.

But the idea is curious. Utopian even.

We have rules in language, rules in society – how much does one dictate the other? Does something really exist until we give it a name? The printing of the Bible changed the religious landscape dramatically. As did the Declaration of Independence. As do our laws… it’s all the power of the written word.

Something to think about…

(If we removed the word money and its need in society would we ever be poor? Now that’s a cool idea!)

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© Casey Carlisle 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Interpreting the spirit

Sometimes there is a different type of language barrier – maybe you’re existing on different Plains?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOne of my favourite challenges while temping, was for a company offering spiritual services and courses. It had more to do with understanding the way my new boss spoke… she didn’t have traditional ways of thinking and I was frequently needing to decipher what is was she was really after. That’s not saying that she was difficult to understand or work for, she just has an artistic interpretation of the world.

We were about to launch a new curriculum and introduce subjects and course material to clientele and the general public. It sounds simple, but throw in a Director who, being true to the stereotype, tended to talk and operate in concepts – and the task became more and more intimidating.

I had to learn a whole new way of communicating and mused how our conversations would look with subtitles:
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It may sound like I had a frustrating task with no leadership when attempting to organise a series of spiritual seminars, but in truth it was fantastic. You could get as creative as you wanted, make things bright and colourful, think outside the box… way outside!

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If you want to know what I did for the seminar:

Instead of throwing together a PowerPoint Presentation on a set list of topics, I created ‘Stations’ around the room which had flatscreens looping material on multimedia packets for each area of speciality. Substituting the typical folder with pages of information for products with our branding, complete with information on use, company background, courses, contact info etc. – essentially a show bag of goodies.

Each station was a sensory adventure with music or live instruments, flowers, burning oils, and shimmery stones. A smorgasbord of stimulation. The Director was then able to head to whichever station she wanted to and give her excitable spiel, with complete freedom to follow a train of thought, or follow where the largest group of participants gathered.

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© Casey Carlisle 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.