Book Review – ‘Darkness Under The Sun’ (#0.5 What The Night Knows) by Dean Koontz

You really shouldn’t talk to strangers.

Darkness Under The Sun Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Horror

No. of pages: 60

From Goodreads:

There once was a killer who knew the night, its secrets and rhythms. How to hide within its shadows. When to hunt. 

He roamed from town to town, city to city, choosing his prey for their beauty and innocence. His cruelties were infinite, his humanity long since forfeit. But still . . . he had not yet discovered how to make his special mark among monsters, how to come fully alive as Death. 

This is the story of how he learned those things, and of what we might do to ensure that he does not visit us. 

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Spotting a review for ‘Darkness Under the Sun’ just before I was about to pick up ‘What the Night Knows’ was kismet. I quickly added this novella to my e-reader ready to submerge into a scary and thrilling prelude, set the tone to whatever paranormal force is to feature in the main novel. And what I read was sufficiently spooky, it reminded me of Roald Dahl or Edgar Allen Poe. I got an unnerved sense straight away about how the protagonist, a thirteen year old Howey Dugley meets a mysterious adult drifter new friend (Alton Turner Blackwood) back in 1989. And I think it’s meant to be on purpose. Red flags start to wave and the reader is meant to notice them… all to set them up for the twist. A twist that gave me a shiver.

Darkness Under The Sun Book Review Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleI’ve been scared by some of Koontz books, afraid to step out of bed in the dark, too chicken to investigate noises outside my window at night. This tale didn’t do that. It left me feeling creeped out. That prickling of hair at the back of your neck.

I appreciated how Howie develops as a character and commits to paying recompense for his actions (fingering fellow school student Ron Bleeker as a bully who deserves recompense to Alton, whom he knows is dangerous) – which in turn takes on a philosophical significance of the story. Not before jumping forward in time to Howies 32nd year, and events begin to re-emerge mirroring the past he’s tried to forget and pay penance for. Leaving us set up for the novel ‘What the Night Knows.’ There is definite dark and supernatural things at work here. And ‘Darkness Under the Sun’ is the perfect teaser.

It’s a quick easy novella to read, Koontz’s usual colourful descriptive style marrying both lush beautiful landscape and brutal gore of a murder scene. Another favourite to add to my collection, you can be assured it is as good as Koontz vintage best. I’m even more keen to read ‘What the Night Knows’ and find out where this all leads and get answers to the mythology. A compact plot with a spiritual message.

Overall feeling: I think I thought I heard someone whispering my name in the dark… eep!

Darkness Under The Sun Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

 

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© Casey Carlisle 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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Book Review – ‘The Taking’ by Dean Koontz

 An alien invasion that will blow your mind.

The Taking Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Horror, Thriller, Science Fiction, Paranormal

No. of pages: 391

From Goodreads:

On the morning that marks the end of the world they have known, Molly and Neil Sloan awaken to the drumbeat of rain on their roof. A luminous silvery downpour is drenching their small California mountain town. It has haunted their sleep, invaded their dreams, and now, in the moody purple dawn, the young couple cannot shake the sense of something terribly wrong.
As the hours pass, Molly and Neil listen to disturbing news of extreme weather phenomena across the globe. By nightfall, their little town loses all contact with the outside world. A thick fog transforms the once-friendly village into a ghostly labyrinth. And soon the Sloans and their neighbors will be forced to draw on reserves of courage and humanity they never knew they had. For within the misty gloom they will encounter something that reveals in a shattering instant what is happening to their world–something that is hunting them with ruthless efficiency.   

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It was good to get lost in a Dean Koontz novel again after so many years away. ‘The Taking’ left me unnerved throughout the first half. That cold shiver, glancing up at every little noise. It’s been a while since a book has managed to illicit that response from me.

I live in a rural area, surrounded by bush, and at night there is nothing but shadow outside, and reading ‘The Taking’ had me deliciously nervous about dark scary things looming just outside my window.

Our protagonist, Molly and her husband face an alien threat so unusual it can be perceived as magical or supernatural – but not the good kind. This was the gory, creepy, flay-your-skin-off kind. I loved it. It felt a little short, or possibly ended too quickly. I wanted a bit more story other than just a survival tale.

I think when I say I wanted more story, I meant that it felt like it was missing something in the guts of the novel. A purpose, a surety… and it’s the alienness, randomness and the bizarre which threw me for a loop. There is an underlying current of spirituality and human spirit, but without the surroundings of the familiar I thought I was missing something. I know that sounds a bit vague, but it’s the best was that I can articulate the sense I got after completing the book.

The Taking Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

There were times where the narrative got a little long winded and I sped read past. Other parts were so graphically and expressively described, I was just about slack jawed in awe. Koontz has such a special turn of phrase at times that it leaves me gob-smacked.

It does end on a note to leave the reader to form his/her own opinions about the events that take place, and I actually really enjoyed that element.

The big take home message to this novel is ‘question everything.’ And it took me a while to catch on, and when I did, the story felt even more brilliant.

A great creepy read I’d recommend to anyone who’s a fan of science fiction, horror, suspense and a good survival story. Dean Koontz had been a staple in my library since I was a tween, so I’ve never been disappointed with this writing.

Overall feeling: Had me sufficiently creeped out.

The Taking Book Review Pic 02 by Casey Carlisle

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© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.