Book Review – ‘By Your Side’ by Kasie West

Locked in a library for the long weekend sounds like a dream come true for me… but this novel was a snooze.

By Your Side Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Y/A, Contemporary, Romance

No. of pages: 346

From Goodreads:

When Autumn Collins finds herself accidentally locked in the library for an entire weekend, she doesn’t think things could get any worse. But that’s before she realizes that Dax Miller is locked in with her. Autumn doesn’t know much about Dax except that he’s trouble. Between the rumors about the fight he was in (and that brief stint in juvie that followed it) and his reputation as a loner, he’s not exactly the ideal person to be stuck with. Still, she just keeps reminding herself that it is only a matter of time before Jeff, her almost-boyfriend, realizes he left her in the library and comes to rescue her.

Only he doesn’t come. No one does.

Instead it becomes clear that Autumn is going to have to spend the next couple of days living off vending-machine food and making conversation with a boy who clearly wants nothing to do with her. Except there is more to Dax than meets the eye. As he and Autumn first grudgingly, and then not so grudgingly, open up to each other, Autumn is struck by their surprising connection. But can their feelings for each other survive once the weekend is over and Autumn’s old life, and old love interest, threaten to pull her from Dax’s side?

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I don’t know what happened, but this has to be my least favourite book by Kasie West. It was still cute, saccharine and romantic goodness. But the characters felt less nuanced, the plot not so credible, and the angst barely there.

I still enjoyed her narrative style, it flows easily and lends to a quick read. I enjoyed the aspect of the protagonist, Autumn, having anxiety disorder – though I feel it could have been explored more, taken more seriously.

Autumn. What to say about Autumn. The anxiety certainly gave her interest, but other than that, she lacked complexity and intelligence. I hate to say it, but she was so bland. Vanilla. #likeeveryotherwhitechick.

Dax showed some promise. A cute, overlooked loner. Hiding pain from a troubled family life. I was waiting for more. Waiting for the twist. But none came. All the characters seemed to be exactly what they were upon first impression. There were no surprises, no big reveals. I think that’s why I found this novel disappointing.

By Your Side Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

Though, Dallin, one of Autumn’s larrikin friends added some much needed tension, it didn’t put enough pressure on the plot to raise the stakes high enough for me to get really invested. And Jeff, the guy Autumn had been pining over was so agreeable and happy, he was like a cute puppy. I think there was a major opportunity lost in not giving him any more depth of character than that. So too can be said for Lisa, the best friend. Autumn’s clique did little to add to the storyline, other than a static choral of hyperactive, generic teens.

I really loved the concept of this novel, but on the whole it felt under-cooked, under-developed. It lacked the punch that I expect from her writing by now.

On a side note: for some reason my copy of ‘By Your Side’ felt cheaply produced the quality of paper and bind-up was thin and wrinkled. I was in constant fear I’d damage the book just by reading it.

By Your Side’ is still a fun read. By no means up to Kasie’s normal standard, but hits all the marks of a soppy romance. Where her books remind me of a satisfying rom-com or cheesy CW show, ‘By Your Side’ felt like a bad Hallmark movie production. I think only die-hard West fans and readers who gorge on romance novels will get anything from this novel, but unfortunately, it’s not one I’m going to recommend freely.

Let’s hope her next release ‘Lucky In Love’ to be released on the 25th of this month returns to her usual writing style and we can chalk ‘By Your Side’ as just a bump in the road.

Overall feeling: it was like warm soup in my hands…

By Your Side Book Review Pic 02 by Casey Carlisle

By Your Side Book Review Pic 04 by Casey Carlisle

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© Casey Carlisle 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Book Review – ‘P.S. I Like You’ by Kasie West

Another great cutsie contemporary from Kasie…

PS I Like You Book Review Pic 01 by Casey Carlisle.jpgGenre: Y/A, Contemporary, Romance

No. of pages: 330

From Goodreads:

Signed, sealed, delivered…

While spacing out in chemistry class, Lily scribbles some of her favorite song lyrics onto her desk. The next day, she finds that someone has continued the lyrics on the desk and added a message to her. Intrigue!

Soon, Lily and her anonymous pen pal are exchanging full-on letters—sharing secrets, recommending bands, and opening up to each other. Lily realizes she’s kind of falling for this letter writer. Only, who is he? As Lily attempts to unravel the mystery and juggle school, friends, crushes, and her crazy family, she discovers that matters of the heart can’t always be spelled out…

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Another enjoyable read from Kasie West. She’s still totally killing it, and one of my automatic buy authors. Her stories are cute, cliché romances that leave you with a warm hug.

P.S. I Like You’ was no different. Our protagonist, Lily, is a quirky hipster musician and quickly found her way into my heart. Her insecurities and social ineptitude pulled her into the ranks of ‘sister’ from the get-go. I will say the madness of her large family household was written perfectly. It was like I was there with her, the noise, clutter, interruptions all in technicolour goodness. I don’t think I have read a book that knocked family life on the head like this so succinctly. I was impressed.

ps-i-like-you-book-review-pic-02-by-casey-carlisleThis story did give me a sharp current of agitation though. The way Lily’s situation unfolded with Cade was narcissistic in a way, and left a bad taste in the back of my throat for over half the novel. This was balanced out by other less aggravating male characters – which was both a positive and a negative for me. Love triangles, or any other shape, vying for the plain girl is so overdone. And I know ‘P.S. I Like You’ does not quite fall into this category, but comes close enough for me to grind my teeth.

I was also left wondering where mutual respect had gone for most of the cast… if you think someone had a boy/girlfriend, then there should be no reason to flirt. That is just distasteful. And to continue for weeks – well that’s all kinds of underhanded, no matter which way you spin it. These characters needed to grow some big hairy morals and take a good look at their actions.

Another thing present in Kasie’s writing is that there are always the typical YA tropes. I’d love to see her write something a little more gritty or dirty and add a new dynamic to her writing.

With the rant over, I liked the way some misunderstandings were revealed later in the story – you can’t have a good romance without some of them. Jumping to conclusions is a quaint storytelling device.

As with all of Kaise West’s story, they are very predictable – I mean hello – a light contemporary romance, it’s why we read them. So there was zero surprises, just me squeeing like some fangirl, eager to get to the good bits. I did like the way the story ended too, it has more of that contemporary touch than her previous novels have had.

I will say that this felt like the best written novel she’s published so far. The pacing is bang on all the way through. In fact, I read it entirely in one sitting in an afternoon. I could not put it down. The way she introduces complex characters is a joy to read. I know this falls into my guilty pleasure category, because you’ll never expect some contrived literary masterpiece, but West shines in her genre, and I always look forward to reading a book from her catalogue. Just like a good rom-com, West’s stories are fun and uplifting.

Overall feeling: another warm-fluffy.

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© Casey Carlisle 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Book Review – ‘Split Second’ by Kasie West

Split between wow and woe.

Split Second Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Y/A, Science Fiction, Romance

No. of pages: 360

From Goodreads:

Life can change in a split second.

Addie hardly recognizes her life since her parents divorced. Her boyfriend used her. Her best friend betrayed her. She can’t believe this is the future she chose. On top of that, her ability is acting up. She’s always been able to Search the future when presented with a choice. Now she can manipulate and slow down time, too… but not without a price.

When Addie’s dad invites her to spend her winter break with him, she jumps at the chance to escape into the Norm world of Dallas, Texas. There she meets the handsome and achingly familiar Trevor. He’s a virtual stranger to her, so why does her heart do a funny flip every time she sees him? But after witnessing secrets that were supposed to stay hidden, Trevor quickly seems more suspicious of Addie than interested in her. And she has an inexplicable desire to change that.

Meanwhile, her best friend, Laila, has a secret of her own: she can restore Addie’s memories… once she learns how. But there are powerful people who don’t want to see this happen. Desperate, Laila tries to manipulate Connor, a brooding bad boy from school—but he seems to be the only boy in the Compound immune to her charms. And the only one who can help her.

As Addie and Laila frantically attempt to retrieve the lost memories, Addie must piece together a world she thought she knew before she loses the love she nearly forgot… and a future that could change everything.

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After the surprise of discovering a sci-fi/paranormal twist to Kasie West’s usual contemporary style from other titles  that I have loved, I was keen to finish off this duology started in ‘Pivot Point,’ and wanted to see where ‘Split Second’ was going to take me.

Split Second Book Review Pic 04 by Casey CarlisleAt first was a little put out from the dual perspectives between Addie and Laila, but warmed up to it. I’d become so familiar with Addie from ‘Pivot Point,’ that her best friends perspective added into the narration was a little intrusive at first. I would have like to have discerned more separation of their voices, even though they are different characters, and Laila is a little more smarmy and aggressive, I still had a minor troubles telling them apart. With that said, the dual perspective really starts to drive the plot forward in the second half as their storylines weave in and out of each other.

I loved Laila’s cheeky one liners – a little over the teasing love-to-hate-you attitude though‎, probably because it has become so prevalent in YA and felt like I’d read it so many times before.

I can’t say there was a lot of character growth, mainly because the pacing is quite fast and situations are pitched at the pair vehemently. Though, all the characters are written expertly and you get a true essence of who they are and their motives.

West pull out all the stops in this sequel when dealing with the characters abilities – I loved the facets of their evolution.

Split Second Book Review Pic 02 by Casey Carlisle

Split Second Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

On the whole, I really enjoyed all elements of this novel. The romances are a little sappy, but that’s Kasie West’s style… and I appreciate this type of guilty pleasure from time to time. Definitely not let down from what I expect from her catalogue.

On a more critical note, I think there could have been an extra few layers of difficulty, and things going wrong to amp up the tension to make the conclusion more rewarding, but on the whole a very satisfying read. Not as confusing as ‘Pivot Point’ given that Addies gift of living two alternate time lines was limited in ‘Split Second,’ and this sequel had a lot more going on. Though the book is fairly predictable, it did give me a few surprises, especially towards the end.

Recommend this duology to anyone who enjoys a gentle romance with a paranormal twist.

Overall feeling: s’okay.

Split Second Book Review Pic 05 by Casey Carlisle

Split Second Book Review Pic 06 by Casey Carlisle

Critique Casey by Casey Carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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A cute duology : ‘Pivot Point‘ and ‘Split Second‘… I’ve read other books by Kasie West and they are all light romantic contemporaries, but this series threw teens with paranormal abilities into the mix.

Book Review – ‘Pivot Point’ by Kasie West

A mix of fate and choice with a paranormal twist – sounds like a great flavor for an ice-cream sundae.

Pivot Point Book Review Pic 01 by Casey Carlisle.jpgGenre: Y/A, Science Fiction, Romance

No. of pages: 343

From Goodreads:

Knowing the outcome doesn’t always make a choice easier… 

Addison Coleman’s life is one big “What if?” As a Searcher, whenever Addie is faced with a choice, she can look into the future and see both outcomes. It’s the ultimate insurance plan against disaster. Or so she thought. When Addie’s parents ambush her with the news of their divorce, she has to pick who she wants to live with—her father, who is leaving the paranormal compound to live among the “Norms,” or her mother, who is staying in the life Addie has always known. Addie loves her life just as it is, so her answer should be easy. One Search six weeks into the future proves it’s not.

In one potential future, Addie is adjusting to life outside the Compound as the new girl in a Norm high school where she meets Trevor, a cute, sensitive artist who understands her. In the other path, Addie is being pursued by the hottest guy in school—but she never wanted to be a quarterback’s girlfriend. When Addie’s father is asked to consult on a murder in the Compound, she’s unwittingly drawn into a dangerous game that threatens everything she holds dear. With love and loss in both lives, it all comes down to which reality she’s willing to live through… and who she can’t live without.

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This was like a YA paranormal version of the movie ‘Sliding Doors’ starring Gwyneth Paltrow.

I didn’t know too much going into the book, I’d read some other titles of Kasie West and assumed that this was another contemporary and was pleasantly surprised with the paranormal element (which plays heavily in the plot and is wrapped up in the identity of our protagonist Addie.)

Pivot Point Book Review Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleAddie. She is relatable to an extent, though I did feel as though she was a bit flaky and tended to go with the flow a fair amount in both futures. It wasn’t until the second half of the book that she actually grew some balls. I was also a little annoyed how it looked like she needed to have a boyfriend to feel whole, and normal.

Laila is a cool best friend. Loved their relationship – this is what best friends are like!

Duke – love interest future No.1. The reveal to his character is fantastic. I pretty much had him pegged straight away, but still managed to be surprised with the twists in the plot.

Trevor – love interest future No.2. Adorkable through and through. Wasn’t taken with him at first, because having two gorgeous footballers in either future just made me want to vomit – I mean come on! But Trevor shows a vulnerable and committed side which completely broke down my walls (as it did with Addie) and I was really rooting for this coupling.

With all these boys you think we’d get some sort of resolution for Addie’s love life, but I guess that comes in ‘Split Second’ the final book in this duology.

A really wonderful story that unfolds masterfully, though did feel slow for the first two thirds. I would have like to have seen the characters have more flaws and not so physically perfect.

The inclusion of Addie’s parents going thorough divorce and her rebelling in one future and not in the other was a quaint touch. I also liked how her parents were present in Addie’s life, which we don’t see in a lot of YA.

At times it is a little hard to keep track of where you’re at – and what version of the future you’re in.

I do like how certain events were unavoidable. I got a little confused at the end as to what was going on – the narration wasn’t very clear, I had to read parts a second time.

I would have rated it higher if not for the pacing and physical tropes of the characters.

It feels long – I think in the fact you have to build up two storylines – and then it all ends rather quickly.

Masterfully plotted. Loved all the different characters (though probably a bit too many) and how both versions of the future intertwine, like getting two different POVs of a single event.

Overall feeling: Masterful plotting

Pivot Point Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

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Critique Casey by Casey Carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Book Review – The Distance Between Us by Kasie West

Creepy dolls, cool cars and cuddly cuteness.

The Distance Between Us Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Y/A, Contemporary, Romance

No. of pages: 312

From Goodreads:

Seventeen-year-old Caymen Meyers studies the rich like her own personal science experiment, and after years of observation she’s pretty sure they’re only good for one thing—spending money on useless stuff, like the porcelain dolls in her mother’s shop.

So when Xander Spence walks into the store to pick up a doll for his grandmother, it only takes one glance for Caymen to figure out he’s oozing rich. Despite his charming ways and that he’s one of the first people who actually gets her, she’s smart enough to know his interest won’t last. Because if there’s one thing she’s learned from her mother’s warnings, it’s that the rich have a short attention span. But Xander keeps coming around, despite her best efforts to scare him off. And much to her dismay, she’s beginning to enjoy his company.

She knows her mom can’t find out—she wouldn’t approve. She’d much rather Caymen hang out with the local rocker who hasn’t been raised by money. But just when Xander’s attention and loyalty are about to convince Caymen that being rich isn’t a character flaw, she finds out that money is a much bigger part of their relationship than she’d ever realized. And that Xander’s not the only one she should’ve been worried about.

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This is the third title from Kasie West that I have read so far in what has turned out to be a typically expected pleasant contemporary. Interesting characters and predicaments make for a lovely romantic escape, and ‘The Distance Between Us’ does not disappoint.

The Distance Between Us Book Review Pic 02 by Casey CarlisleCaymen was a lot like me growing up (except I had two parents with high expectations and rules like hers). Her hard work ethic masking a romantic, yet practical side gave Caymen a grounded edge that had me easily relating to her. It was a nice break from flighty and stubborn protagonists and lent our lead a realistic and mature edge.

It was great to see a love interest that was just what he seemed. I lurved Xander. He was real, making no apologies for his lifestyle and the resources he has at hand. Yes, that can be a little entitled, but he wore it well. I was ready to tackle Caymen to the ground and claim Xander all for myself.

One thing about this novel – the doll shop had me freaked out – porcelain dolls are scary little buggars. I can remember my cousin chasing me around the back yard with one when I was younger wanting to play… the only thing you’ll get out of me with those creepy things about is a scream and a cloud of dust in my wake.

I do enjoy Kasie’s writing style, it’s very easy to read and lends to a fast paced afternoon read. Great to curl up on the lounge and while away a lazy weekend!

The surprise ending was a little cliché, but with a romance, it’s mostly expected. Very after school special. Recommended for those who enjoy quick, light-hearted, contemporary reads.

Overall feeling: strange + cute = adorkable

The Distance Between Us Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

The Distance Between Us Book Review Pic 04 by Casey Carlisle

Critique Casey by Casey Carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Book Review – On the Fence by Kasie West

A little on the fence about ‘On The Fence’ but ultimately enjoyed this cotton-candy contemporary.

On The Fence Book Review Pic 01 by Casey CarlisleGenre: Y/A, Contemporary, Romance

No. of pages: 296

From Goodreads:

For sixteen-year-old Charlotte Reynolds, aka Charlie, being raised by a single dad and three older brothers has its perks. She can outrun, outscore, and outwit every boy she knows—including her longtime neighbor and honorary fourth brother, Braden. But when it comes to being a girl, Charlie doesn’t know the first thing about anything. So when she starts working at chichi boutique to pay off a speeding ticket, she finds herself in a strange new world of makeup, lacy skirts, and BeDazzlers. Even stranger, she’s spending time with a boy who has never seen her tear it up in a pickup game.

To cope with the stress of faking her way through this new reality, Charlie seeks late-night refuge in her backyard, talking out her problems with Braden by the fence that separates them. But their Fence Chats can’t solve Charlie’s biggest problem: she’s falling for Braden. Hard. She knows what it means to go for the win, but if spilling her secret means losing him for good, the stakes just got too high.

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On The Fence Book Review Pic 03 by Casey CarlisleFor a fun contemporary romance, Kasie West is quickly cementing her place as one of my top go-to authors: interesting characters and stories that are like a warm hug.

I liked how Charlie was an athlete – I was starting to get over alternative, quirky, coffee addicts that have been teeming YA of late. Also, the family dynamic of Charlie’s all-male family added a great dynamic, how the men in her life are protective of her whether she is aware of it or not; and how they rough-house with her as well.

Her fathers, attempts at raising a daughter, while commendable, did come across as a little cliché, I was wondering where the doting father went – he was too stand-offish and left me wondering if he was a good father at all. But he manages to redeem himself in my eyes.

Charlie was a good character to relate to, although at times I felt she was too immature, and her behaviour insulting to herself and her brothers (but sometimes her brothers deserved it.) There were also some trite moments that annoyed me, and I felt, did not need to be in the book. But I won’t talk about them here, because – spoilers!

On The Fence Book Review Pic 04 by Casey CarlisleI did take a little issue with the fact how the book step up Charlie (and her missing a female role model as her mother passed away when she was young) in knowing little about fashion and make-up as somewhat deficient in being female. I did not see her as anything less, or nothing other than a strong female role model in herself. It rubbed against my sensibility that an interest in the superficial world of clothing and facial products has anything to do with being female or acceptance by other female peers. But with that said, it was cute and fun (politics aside).

Braden was a sweet boy-next-door character, and again, very typical of this genre, but I liked his tenacity and acceptance of Charlie for who she is, without all the trappings of fashionable accessories.

On The Fence Book Review Pic 05 by Casey Carlisle

Some of the midnight conversations at the fence were touching, and others pointless and contrived. With such a poignant image defining the book, it would have been good that all these interactions were kept embodying the soul of the novel – as some of Charlie’s talks felt immature and irrelevant. But this is only a very small part (and my opinion), and the nocturnal blatherings are a fantastic part of the story and one of my favourites.

I really enjoy Kasie West’s writing style, and have not come across a book of hers that I have not liked. They are luscious uncomplicated reads, yes predictable, but quick, well-paced guilty pleasures that don’t come off too kitsch.

Overall feeling: Cute but average.

On The Fence Book Review Pic 06 by Casey Carlisle

On The Fence Book Review Pic 07 by Casey Carlisle

Critique Casey by Casey Carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Book Review – The Fill-in Boyfriend by Kasie West

Playing Pretend at Prom…


The Fill-in BoyfriendGenre:
Y/A, Contemporary, Romance

No. of pages: 352

From Goodreads:

When Gia Montgomery’s boyfriend, Bradley, dumps her in the parking lot of her high school prom, she has to think fast. After all, she’d been telling her friends about him for months now. This was supposed to be the night she proved he existed. So when she sees a cute guy waiting to pick up his sister, she enlists his help. The task is simple: be her fill-in boyfriend—two hours, zero commitment, a few white lies. After that, she can win back the real Bradley.

The problem is that days after prom, it’s not the real Bradley she’s thinking about, but the stand-in. The one whose name she doesn’t even know. But tracking him down doesn’t mean they’re done faking a relationship. Gia owes him a favor and his sister intends to see that he collects: his ex-girlfriend’s graduation party—three hours, zero commitment, a few white lies.

Just when Gia begins to wonder if she could turn her fake boyfriend into a real one, Bradley comes waltzing back into her life, exposing her lie, and threatening to destroy her friendships and her new-found relationship. 

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This is a light and fuffy read, and I found, completely hilarious. ‘The Fill-in Boyfriend’ has to be one of the best Kasie West novels I’ve read so far (and has encouraged me to purchase her entire catalogue).

Gia is a girl after my own heart – I relate to her. In fact I was a lot like her in High School. And who doesn’t do silly things in their youth to save face in front of their friends? Gia possesses a hint of devil-may-care about her which is at constant war with insecurity. This drives her choices; some idiotic, some marvellous. I think it is also behind why she has never experienced true, gut-wrenching, all-encompassing love. She has always been guarded. I loved getting to see her grow and slowly test all of her preconceived notions – and even some she hadn’t thought of.

The Fill-in Boyfriend Book Review Pic 05 by Casey CarlisleFake Bradley (Hayden) has cemented his place amongst my favourite fictional boyfriends. He crossed everything I have listed on my ideal boyfriend list (yes, I have a list). Tall and bookish with the right mix of compassion and bravado. His younger sister, Bec helps to balance out the cast. Her straight-talk and perception from the fringes of Gia’s world, contrast the passive-aggressive niceness of the ‘in’ crowd.

All of that let ‘The Fill-in Boyfriend’ balance on the line between cheesy and realistic – perfect for a contemporary romance you want to escape with. With a saccharine writing style and a story line which continually drives you forward with its character development, this is a book you can read in one sitting if so desired (I did). As with most in this genre the overall plot is predictable – but the sub-plots were a delight.

Recommended to anyone who enjoys happy endings and meet-cute. Now… I need to find my own Fake Bradley/Hayden….

Overall feeling: tee hee hee… aww!

The Fill-in Boyfriend Book Review Pic 03 by Casey Carlisle

The Fill-in Boyfriend Book Review Pic 04 by Casey Carlisle

Critique Casey by Casey Carlisle

© Casey Carlisle 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Casey Carlisle with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.